fauxybeast
crazycritterlife:

query-and-echo:

crazycritterlife:

I took Ollie out of the mews yesterday for the first time in a couple weeks and he was just as adorable and cuddly as ever! This bird’s personality amazes me.

Why aren’t you wearing a glove?

Because it’s a kestrel. He’s tiny. Gloves are not necessary. I only use the glove with him during training or feeding. 

crazycritterlife:

query-and-echo:

crazycritterlife:

I took Ollie out of the mews yesterday for the first time in a couple weeks and he was just as adorable and cuddly as ever! This bird’s personality amazes me.

Why aren’t you wearing a glove?

Because it’s a kestrel. He’s tiny. Gloves are not necessary. I only use the glove with him during training or feeding. 

robingoch
renatagrieco:

September 1, 2014 - Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla)
Found in forests of the eastern United States and Canada during the summer, these birds winter in Central America and the Caribbean. They eat insects and other invertebrates, picking them from leaf litter, trees, and the air. Their song is very loud and sounds like “tea-cher” repeated four to six times per second. Males in neighboring territories will sing together, rarely overlapping their songs. Females build dome-shaped nests on the forest floor. The bird’s common name refers to the nest’s oven-like shape.

renatagrieco:

September 1, 2014 - Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla)

Found in forests of the eastern United States and Canada during the summer, these birds winter in Central America and the Caribbean. They eat insects and other invertebrates, picking them from leaf litter, trees, and the air. Their song is very loud and sounds like “tea-cher” repeated four to six times per second. Males in neighboring territories will sing together, rarely overlapping their songs. Females build dome-shaped nests on the forest floor. The bird’s common name refers to the nest’s oven-like shape.